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Box Small Collections Box 15

 Container

Contains 76 Results:

Letters , 1861-1862

 File — Box: Small Collections Box 15, Folder: 1
Identifier: id26015
Scope and Contents

Letters to his parents, sisters and brother telling about his experiences.

Letter from Sally Park Turner Alexander to Aunt Betsy, 1860 January 20

 Item — Box: Small Collections Box 15, Folder: 1, Object: 1
Scope and Contents

A letter from Sally Park (Turner) Alexander, Park Forest [?] to “Aunt Betsy” [?], Texas. She sSends news of relatives and local happenings to “Aunt Betsy” in Texas. Typescript included.

Letter from Norfleet Smith to Major Brien, 1864 November 14

 Item — Box: Small Collections Box 15, Folder: 1, Object: 2
Scope and Contents

A letter from Norfleet Smith, 1st Lieut., Co “G”, 3rd N.C. Cavalry, Barringer’s Brigade to Major Brien, near Petersburg, Va. He requests 12 hour leave of absence to visit Petersburg to attend to business matters. He is including a note granting permission by order of Lt. Col. Moore, signed by L.S. Warren.

Letter from Mark T. Alexander to his mother Sally Park Turner Alexander, 1864 November 15

 Item — Box: Small Collections Box 15, Folder: 1, Object: 3
Scope and Contents A letter from Mark T. Alexander, Head Quarters, Rosser’s Cavalry Division, C.S.A. to his mother, Sally Park (Turner) Alexander, no place. He reports his division had gone to Middleburg and has taken 225 prisoners. He discusses the New Creek, W.VA. raid and tells of the controversy over the order to send back all able bodied men. General Thomas L. Rosser has treated Gen. Fitzhugh Lee “very discourteously” by sending back all of his Hd.Qtrs. Rosser is surrounded by men who “would black his...

Persons enslaved by Mark Alexander Senior of the county of Mecklenburg..., 1865 April 9

 Item — Box: Small Collections Box 15, Folder: 1, Object: 4
Scope and Contents

A list of 217 persons enslaved by Mark Alexander Senior of Mecklenburg County, Va., on the day of the surrender of the Army of Virginia by Gen. Robert E. Lee, giving names, ages, sex, and occupations.

Letter from Sally Park Turner Alexander to her daughter, Nannie, 1867 June 3

 Item — Box: Small Collections Box 15, Folder: 1, Object: 5
Scope and Contents

A letter from Sally Park (Turner) Alexander, no place, to her daughter Nannie, no place. She relates family news. Xerox copy.

Cassimere Churchill, Albany, New York, to "Dear Brother" (Deacon), 1861 November 18

 Item — Box: Small Collections Box 15, Folder: 1, Object: 1
Identifier: id26015
Scope and Contents

Cassimere writes of bathing and the system of water and pipes. He describes the infantry's barracks, artillery leaving for Washington, D.C., the city, and Hudson River. He tells of a court martial, fight in town, and drilling exercise where men left formation when asked "to form on fours." He advises his brother, "I want you to be a man in every respect, a man that is a Man is the noblest work of God."

Cassimere Churchill, Washington, to "Dear Brother", 1861 December 10-16

 Item — Box: Small Collections Box 15, Folder: 1, Object: 2
Identifier: id26015
Scope and Contents

Cassimere writes how he woke sleeping sentries, but didn't report them, even though a risk to his post. A large Balloon passes over camp. A comrade died during the night from measles. "I have been strutting around camp with a new carbine..." He tells about the sachel he sent home.

Cassimere Churchill, Washington, to "Dear Sister", 1861 December 18

 Item — Box: Small Collections Box 15, Folder: 1, Object: 3
Identifier: id26015
Scope and Contents Cassimere writes, "Eunice talks of enlisting as soon as she gets her regimentals. Do you think she would be accepted..." He writes a poem about home and loved ones. He comments, "...if they would let us we would wipe out every rebel in a short time, but it is not policy to shed any more blood than can be helped." They aren't allowed paper to get the news. 20,000 men have been moved over the river. War policy is to not let soldiers know what is happening in the War Department. He discusses...

Cassimere Churchill, Washington, to "Dear parents", 1861 December 24

 Item — Box: Small Collections Box 15, Folder: 1, Object: 4
Identifier: id26015
Scope and Contents

Note on top of letter: "Please do not let anyone see this." Cassimere writes of his drilling exercises. He was sick and got medicine, but threw it away so he could "die a natural death." A comrade gave him coal and molasses. He describes Description of cooking utensils and cooking in his tent.