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Fort Eustis (Va.)--History

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings

Found in 4 Collections and/or Records:

Battery D, 10th Anti-Aircraft Training Battalion photograph, 1943

 Collection
Identifier: SC 01689
Scope and Contents Black and white photograph of servicemen with Battery D, 10th Anti-Aircraft Training Battalion at Fort Eustis, Virginia under the command of Captain R.E. Eisele. The photograph is labeled by row with last name and first and middle name initials. A flag is located at the photograph's center, against a background of trees. The servicemen are either seated and standing on wooden bleachers. There is a warning printed along the photograph's bottom: "Existing regulations prohibit the...

Kenneth Brady Letters

 Collection
Identifier: SC 01331
Scope and Contents Letters, 1951-1953, written by Kenneth Brady to Mary Brady, his mother, during his service in the Korean War. He serves at Ft. Bragg, Camp Drum, Ft. Hood, Ft. Eustis, and finally Sokcho, Gangwon-do Province, South Korea, as part of the Transportation Corps of the 8th Army.

Althea Hunt Papers

 Collection
Identifier: UA 6.028
Scope and Contents Papers of Althea Hunt, faculty member at the College of William and Mary in the English and Fine Arts departments and director of the William and Mary Theatre from 1926-61, including news clippings, articles by and about Miss Hunt, programs from productions, photographs, correspondence (mostly by students to Miss Hunt), galley proofs, computer lists, and preliminary materials relating to the publication of the William and Mary Theatre: A Chronicle, edited by...

Winston & Company Records

 Collection
Identifier: Mss. 39.2 W73
Scope and Contents Correspondence, 1918, of Winston & Company, Richmond, Va. with former employees concerning back pay owed them for work done at Camp Abraham Eustis, Lee Hall, Va. (now Fort Eustis, Va.). Winston & Company had offices in New York City and Richmond, Va. For the Camp Eustis project, the company had a job office on location. The letters in the collection are addressed to the job office. It is assumed that probably the Richmond office had control of the project.