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John Quincy Adams Letter to St. George Tucker

 Collection
Identifier: SC 01200

Scope and Contents

John Quincy Adams to St. George Tucker, August 5, 1819, sending him 12 bound volumes of the Fifteeth Congress, First session [4 vols. Extant in Tucker's library].

Dates

  • 1819 August 5

Creator

Language of Materials

English

Physical Description

1 item.

Conditions Governing Access:

Collection is open to all researchers. Manuscript collections and archival records may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal or state right to privacy laws and regulations, such as the Virginia Public Records Act (Code of Virginia. § 42.1-76-91); and the Virginia Freedom of Information Act (Code of Virginia § 2.2-3705.5). Confidential material may include, but is not limited to, educational, medical, and personnel records. If sensitive material is found in this collection, please contact a staff member immediately. The disclosure of personally identifiable information pertaining to a living individual may have legal consequences for which the College of William and Mary assumes no responsibility.

Conditions Governing Use:

Before reproducing or quoting from any materials, in whole or in part, permission must be obtained from the Special Collections Research Center, and the holder of the copyright, if not Swem Library.

Biographical Information:

John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 - February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and President of the United States (March 4, 1825 - March 4, 1829). His party affiliations were Federalist, Democratic-Republican, National Republican, and later Whig. Adams was the son of U.S. President John Adams, and Abigail Adams. He is most famous as a diplomat involved in many international negotiations, and for formulating the Monroe Doctrine. As president he proposed a grand program of modernization and educational advancement, but was unable to get it through Congress. Late in life, as a Congressman, he was a leading opponent of the Slave Power, arguing that if a civil war ever broke out the president could abolish slavery by using his war powers, a policy followed by Abraham Lincoln in the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863.

Extent

0.01 Linear Foot

Acquisition Information:

Purchase.

Related Materials:

Mss. 40 T79 Tucker-Coleman Papers

Physical Description

1 item.
Title
Guide to the John Quincy Adams Letter to St. George Tucker
Author
Finding Aid Authors: Anne Johnson.
Date
2010-03-22
Language of description
The collection description/finding aid is written in English

Repository Details

Part of the Special Collections Research Center Repository

Contact: