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Box Small Collections Box 94

 Container

Contains 24 Results:

Letters

 File — Box: Small Collections Box 94, Folder: 1
Content Description From the Collection:

Collection of six letters from addressed to Florence E. DeSantes. Cashier served as a Private in Company "G" of the 16th Infantry Division during World War, II. His letters are from North Africa and England where Cashier was training for the Allied invasion into France. He writes about missing his sweetheart, Florence, anticipation of their upcoming wedding, and of wishing the war was over or that he could at least get a furlough for a short while before fighting again.

Letters

 File — Box: Small Collections Box 94, Folder: 1
Content Description From the Collection:

Collection of five letters, a telegram, and pictures addressed to George T. Yusa spanning the years 1947- 1948. Most of the letters give updates on fellow servicemen from World War II and detail the fear of another war with Korea based on President Truman's talk and actions. Yusa ultimately reenlisted in the Army and fought in Korea. He was severely wounded in June 1951 but recovered from his injuries.

Postcards

 File — Box: Small Collections Box 94, Folder: 1
Content Description From the Collection:

Three postcards circa 1900 depicting African Americans. One postcard shows workers in a peanut field, another features a child on a pile of picked cotton. The third is a picture of James Smith, posed seated with a cane in one hand and a hat in another. It states that he was age 93, born in 1813 and the oldest living man in Hampton, Virginia.

Prints

 File — Box: Small Collections Box 94, Folder: 1
Content Description From the Collection: Collection of five cartoons of Gene Nichol, President of William and Mary, drawn by Gary Brookins for the Richmond Times Dispatch between 2006 and 2008. The caricatures were drawn as part of the negative response to Nichol’s decision to remove the cross from permanent display in the Wren Chapel. This action evoked criticism from alumni, students, and donors, causing one to revoke a 12 million dollar pledge. Nichol’s controversy continued and he eventually resigned as president in 2008. ...

Letter

 File — Box: Small Collections Box 94, Folder: 1
Content Description From the Collection:

Two page letter addressed to his sweetheart, Ruthie S. Davis, letting her know how much he misses her.

Letter

 File — Box: Small Collections Box 94, Folder: 1
Content Description From the Collection:

Two page letter addressed to his parents letting them know of his change in companies and barracks while attending the Citadel.

Letter

 File — Box: Small Collections Box 94, Folder: 1
Content Description From the Collection: Six page letter addressed to his wife dated June 15, 1944. In it, he addresses the unknown plans for himself and other troop members, dispels rumors she may have heard about troop plans, and cautions her about the Army censoring their letters. Henry also reports about a swim exercise coordinated by their regiment leader. All were required to swim 100 yards in the pool. Of the group, only 12 were able to complete this task. As a result, the plan was made to visit the pool weekly in order...

Letter

 File — Box: Small Collections Box 94, Folder: 1
Content Description From the Collection:

Two page letter addressed to "mother and all" giving a report of his work and leisure time while stationed at the Marine Barracks at Camp Lejeune, NC. Ervin reports that he is being sent to chemical warfare school.

Letter

 File — Box: Small Collections Box 94, Folder: 1
Content Description From the Collection:

Two page letter written on USO stationary to a former commander, Lieutenant Colonel Louis Weiss. Because of censorship and the secrecy of his work, Monk cannot discuss locations, topics of jobs, or even names of others he interacts with. He does, however, comment at length regarding the weather.

Letters

 File — Box: Small Collections Box 94, Folder: 1
Content Description From the Collection: Three letters from Chester Dobbs to his mother and his girlfriend written while he was stationed at Marseilles and Brest, France at the end of World War I while serving in Company A of the 11th Regiment of the United States Marines. He reports on his activities at his duty stations, dances held for the troops, food service, and baseball games that keep everyone occupied as they all await their next orders. Most hope to go home, but Dobbs is realistic about the need for many to serve in...